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Mathew
30-06-2011, 09:35 PM
Hey,
I've got my EPQ (Extended Project Qualification) to write in the near future and to put things simply... I need to write 5,000 words on a topic of my choice. I have to keep a production log book, so I really need to get as much research about this as possible by collecting different interpretations, opinions and views, and then recording it. Rather in-keeping with my desire to study English, I've decided to discuss:

Are regional accents dying out?

Some would suggest that due to social mobility and the rat race, people are now commuting into the big cities such as London. This means people as far afield as Wiltshire, Reading and Oxford will all be working together; hence having the possiblity to create a whole new London accent.

On the other hand, others would suggest that institutions like the BBC are now widening their horizons and relaxing their rules on who presents their news on the TV. Presenters such as Hew Edwards (who comes from Wales, which has a strong regional accent) are now reading our news and straying further away from received pronunciation (standard English). Perhaps this is down to political correctness and the constant desire for equality in society. It's highly possible that the BBC feel they're out of touch with the public if they limit their news readers to the typical, middle class accent; RP.

Any further opinions? :)
Matt

GommeInc
30-06-2011, 10:12 PM
I wouldn't say they are dying out, but I would say that the media, Government and other public services have relaxed their rules about the use of regional accents. On a social level, regional accents are as strong as ever. In a University community, you get all the accents mixing together but no accent hybrids come out of this. If anything you get used to them, and retain your accent - something one of my Welsh friends noticed.

Mathew
17-07-2011, 10:11 PM
I wouldn't say they are dying out, but I would say that the media, Government and other public services have relaxed their rules about the use of regional accents. On a social level, regional accents are as strong as ever. In a University community, you get all the accents mixing together but no accent hybrids come out of this. If anything you get used to them, and retain your accent - something one of my Welsh friends noticed.
I forgot all about this thread, thank you for replying! :)

I think your final sentence is very interesting and I should be able to talk about upward and downward divergence / convergence if I structure the essay in a certain way. Thanks for the viewpoint from a personal level! :)

Anyone else have anything to add?

-:Undertaker:-
18-07-2011, 11:31 AM
No doubt in some areas the regional accent has been completely eradicated thanks to uncontrolled immigration.

Jordy
18-07-2011, 12:09 PM
No doubt in some areas the regional accent has been completely eradicated thanks to uncontrolled immigration.Many immigrants (Perhaps not first generation though) gain regional accents I find.


None of the things people have come up with leads me to believe there's any reasons why regional accents would die out, where-ever I go there always seem a variety. Even different parts of Nottingham have quite noticeably different accents.

-:Undertaker:-
18-07-2011, 04:45 PM
Many immigrants (Perhaps not first generation though) gain regional accents I find.

Provided its not flooded (the area), some areas have different streets with different groups in who can't speak English nevermind one anothers tongue.

Firehorse
04-08-2011, 06:17 PM
I don't think so no. I haven't noticed any change in the amount of regional accents I hear in the media.

Zak
05-08-2011, 01:19 PM
I watched a programme on BBC1 I think it was called 'The Scheme' followed a load of people on a housing scheme in Kilmarnock & it was like full on impossible to understand what they were saying. Their accents were so strong that they had to add subtitles on screen.

beth
05-08-2011, 01:23 PM
my regional accent (birmingham, though i went to college in dudley so i have a black country/yamyam twang) isn't dying out, but it's never on television because i don't think people like it. if it is on tv it's used to back up an archetype of a 'stupid' person. it's discrimination really because i talk like that and i'm not ******ed haha ;).

Shadow-Mason
11-08-2011, 01:59 AM
my regional accent (birmingham, though i went to college in dudley so i have a black country/yamyam twang) isn't dying out, but it's never on television because i don't think people like it. if it is on tv it's used to back up an archetype of a 'stupid' person. it's discrimination really because i talk like that and i'm not ******ed haha ;).

I have to agree with you there, I also have the Black Country accent, which in certain aspects, gives me a disadvantage at business and work.

Intersocial
11-08-2011, 11:22 PM
I'd say that the regional accents aren't as strong and as "stereotypical" as they used to be - e.g. everyone living in wiltshire, talks with a "farmers" accent.

Because...I live in wiltshire myself :L - and I don't have a farmers accent - but now and then, words I say will come out - in a stereotypical accent.

I think it's not vanishing completely - but more people have become accustomed to "chav talk", so there's not much "regional accent" about anymore.

RyRy
11-08-2011, 11:28 PM
No they're not bloody hell. Come to Bristol, see what you think about regional accents. I'll assure you that they're not dying down, though with that accent I wish it bloody would.

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