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  1. #1
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    Default University - Postgraduate Level

    Is there anyone studying at Postgraduate Level at University (Masters/PhD) or wishing too?

    If so, why/what keeps you motivated to continue?


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    I completed my Masters last year. I finished my undergraduate five years prior, but went back to study for a postgraduate degree because I was unhappy with my life at the time. I didn't feel very fondly toward my initial subject, so I changed course. Thereafter, I enjoyed it quite a bit. I found that, in undergraduate, you're often encouraged to engage with other scholars and to assimilate their theories and practices into your own work. At postgraduate level, you're expected to develop your own methods. I don't know what you're studying/wanting to study, so it may well differ, but I found it an important step in developing as an academic, and it gave me a lot more confidence in my own abilities. I certainly feel more accomplished and adept now.

    I did, however, struggle with motivation nearer the end. Never with any of my course work or essays, but particularly with my dissertation. I also posted about it. I have a tendency to leave things until the last minute, and this was such an enormous amount of work that it was weighing down on me. I had a job on top of full-time study, so that didn't help, either. Nevertheless, eventually I did begin, and once I got into the groove the words began to flow. I thought I may have ruined it by leaving it so late, and by picking a topic that was ultimately too extensive, but my assessors described it as ambitious and original. One gave it a distinction and the other a merit.

    I found a lot of motivation in my subject. I genuinely love what I was studying and was happy to be writing about it. It's also a tremendous achievement. I don't think a persons worth should be dependent solely on how academically proficient they are, but it's a large undertaking, and to complete any level of degree is worthy of merit. Whether it's entirely warranted or not, people will take you more seriously. I was at a very stagnant point and felt that academia was a needed change of pace. Ultimately, it was. I matured both personally and academically, and I'm glad I decided to go back and study.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neversoft View Post
    I completed my Masters last year. I finished my undergraduate five years prior, but went back to study for a postgraduate degree because I was unhappy with my life at the time. I didn't feel very fondly toward my initial subject, so I changed course. Thereafter, I enjoyed it quite a bit. I found that, in undergraduate, you're often encouraged to engage with other scholars and to assimilate their theories and practices into your own work. At postgraduate level, you're expected to develop your own methods. I don't know what you're studying/wanting to study, so it may well differ, but I found it an important step in developing as an academic, and it gave me a lot more confidence in my own abilities. I certainly feel more accomplished and adept now.

    I did, however, struggle with motivation nearer the end. Never with any of my course work or essays, but particularly with my dissertation. I also posted about it. I have a tendency to leave things until the last minute, and this was such an enormous amount of work that it was weighing down on me. I had a job on top of full-time study, so that didn't help, either. Nevertheless, eventually I did begin, and once I got into the groove the words began to flow. I thought I may have ruined it by leaving it so late, and by picking a topic that was ultimately too extensive, but my assessors described it as ambitious and original. One gave it a distinction and the other a merit.

    I found a lot of motivation in my subject. I genuinely love what I was studying and was happy to be writing about it. It's also a tremendous achievement. I don't think a persons worth should be dependent solely on how academically proficient they are, but it's a large undertaking, and to complete any level of degree is worthy of merit. Whether it's entirely warranted or not, people will take you more seriously. I was at a very stagnant point and felt that academia was a needed change of pace. Ultimately, it was. I matured both personally and academically, and I'm glad I decided to go back and study.
    How did you full time study and work?

    I would really like to go back to do a Masters but I can only really afford it if I do it part time and work part time too. I live quite a bit away from any Campus too so I'd need to factor in travel costs. I live alone so that's also difficult. Feels almost impossible for me to be able to do it, especially when I have some debt already to clear. Sigh.





  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neversoft View Post
    I completed my Masters last year. I finished my undergraduate five years prior, but went back to study for a postgraduate degree because I was unhappy with my life at the time. I didn't feel very fondly toward my initial subject, so I changed course. Thereafter, I enjoyed it quite a bit. I found that, in undergraduate, you're often encouraged to engage with other scholars and to assimilate their theories and practices into your own work. At postgraduate level, you're expected to develop your own methods. I don't know what you're studying/wanting to study, so it may well differ, but I found it an important step in developing as an academic, and it gave me a lot more confidence in my own abilities. I certainly feel more accomplished and adept now.

    I did, however, struggle with motivation nearer the end. Never with any of my course work or essays, but particularly with my dissertation. I also posted about it. I have a tendency to leave things until the last minute, and this was such an enormous amount of work that it was weighing down on me. I had a job on top of full-time study, so that didn't help, either. Nevertheless, eventually I did begin, and once I got into the groove the words began to flow. I thought I may have ruined it by leaving it so late, and by picking a topic that was ultimately too extensive, but my assessors described it as ambitious and original. One gave it a distinction and the other a merit.

    I found a lot of motivation in my subject. I genuinely love what I was studying and was happy to be writing about it. It's also a tremendous achievement. I don't think a persons worth should be dependent solely on how academically proficient they are, but it's a large undertaking, and to complete any level of degree is worthy of merit. Whether it's entirely warranted or not, people will take you more seriously. I was at a very stagnant point and felt that academia was a needed change of pace. Ultimately, it was. I matured both personally and academically, and I'm glad I decided to go back and study.
    Great response. I am currently doing my Masters now, Part time as I have three jobs (two of them are volunteer positions). I do my dissertation next year, but not looking forward to it. I had a three year break from my Undergrad before starting my Masters and I am finding it a struggle to get into the swing of things again, but I have just completed my second masters unit (in regards to workload) just another three units plus dissertation to go! What I have noticed is that most people are not bothered about grades at Masters level, unlike the pressure in Undergrad. so I would actually be happy with a PASS at Masters as what an achievement to hold a Masters degree!

    - Well done on completing yours though!

    Quote Originally Posted by buttons View Post
    How did you full time study and work?

    I would really like to go back to do a Masters but I can only really afford it if I do it part time and work part time too. I live quite a bit away from any Campus too so I'd need to factor in travel costs. I live alone so that's also difficult. Feels almost impossible for me to be able to do it, especially when I have some debt already to clear. Sigh.
    Working and studying is a struggle. You have to REALLY plan your time or before you know it, it is the night before a deadline. With regards to your living arrangements, have you thought of Distant learning? That way you can study from home.


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    Quote Originally Posted by buttons View Post
    How did you full time study and work?
    With some difficulty. I studied Creative Writing at first, but found I barely had enough time in the week to read a book, study the supplementary materials, form my own analysis, and complete whatever else was going on, on top of going to work. I swapped to Film and found it more manageable, since there was less required materials to complete every week. At postgraduate level, you only have to attend class very occasionally, though. You are expected to work independently most of the time. I was in just one day a week on a Thursday, which happened to be one of my days off (thankfully). The lectures were always in the evening (5pm to 8/9pm). The courses are very adult orientated; they expect people to have other things going on, such as work or travel. Though if you are about, the tutors often teach undergraduate, too, and on my course, we were free to sit in on those classes as well, if we wanted.

    I worked nights, four days a week. I'd complete most of my work on my days off. I didn't have too much trouble until it came to my dissertation. That really needed a lot of consistent focus; I found I couldn't keep leaving it and returning to it, so I used up as much holiday as I could at work, to ensure I had sufficient time to work on it. I probably would have done less hours at work if I could, but I also live alone and had rent and bills to pay. The postgraduate loan helped, but I felt it was better kept for a rainy day, rather than stop work, use it all up, and find myself penniless at the end of my degree. I thought about doing the course part time, which would make it two years instead of one, but I didn't want to stretch it out more than it needed to be. In the end, I don't think it would have made a difference to me.

    Your situation sounds similar to mine, though. I live by myself and I had to travel to university, which took at least two hours, sometimes longer. I couldn't afford it myself, but there's funding in place now (also for Scotland). I probably never would have done it if I wasn't able to get a loan. It's not impossible, but it can seem daunting. I had been away from education for five years when I went back, and I remember wondering whether I'd have enough focus or gumption. I think the key is to find something you really love doing; it makes all the strenuous times bearable.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cookie View Post
    Great response. I am currently doing my Masters now, Part time as I have three jobs (two of them are volunteer positions). I do my dissertation next year, but not looking forward to it. I had a three year break from my Undergrad before starting my Masters and I am finding it a struggle to get into the swing of things again, but I have just completed my second masters unit (in regards to workload) just another three units plus dissertation to go! What I have noticed is that most people are not bothered about grades at Masters level, unlike the pressure in Undergrad. so I would actually be happy with a PASS at Masters as what an achievement to hold a Masters degree!

    - Well done on completing yours though!
    I felt that at the beginning; whether or not I would be able to get back into a studious mindset. I did my degree full-time, so I think it helped that I had a lot of work to get on with straight away. I didn't really have any option but to get to it. The dissertation seems a lot more daunting than it actually is. Mine had a limit of 16,000 words, which I struggled to stay under come the end. I would recommend you spend as much time as you can researching your topic. Once you know it inside and out, you'll find the rest quite straightforward. Postgraduate is quite a step up from undergraduate, so just being able to graduate is a feat. Though the cruel thing about a Masters degree is that the dissertation is worth a very large portion, and you need to pass the dissertation in order to graduate with honours. Even if you ace all your units, the dissertation will largely dictate your final grade. Thank you! Best of luck with yours. It's a great feeling once you complete it. I'm very proud of my work and trying to take it to the next step now.
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    I never really found it necessary to go beyond a degree. IT doesn't really require a postgraduate education imo.

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    I'm currently studying for a LLM in Law, having studied Film and TV at undergrad level, it was a massive jump. On top of it all, I've just been diagnosed with a long term brain disorder, but I really enjoy it. It's a much better fit for me and the interaction with the materials, although writing in excess of 6k words a week, is really rewarding. I did my undergrad three years ago, and hated every second of it, but this feels different. You get to develop your own critical thinking, instead of just throwing in the ideas of other people.
    I was working 30 hour weeks in the first couple of weeks, but that's really not a viable option, now I'm down to 15 and I secured a 3.5k grant to help me along. If you're passionate about what you want to study, I'd definitely go ahead and do it, there are lots of financing options these days, you just have to research them and apply early for grants.
    If I can do it with a brain that quite literally does the opposite of what it should and still enjoy it, then you can too

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    I'm still thinking about doing it but I didn't even start my work yet and it's gonna be quite hectic tbh. So, I'm not really sure if I have what it takes to further more.

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