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  1. #1
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    Default Convicted felon allowed to volunteer at school?




    Should a convicted felon be allowed to volunteer at their child’s school?



    So apparently in the US or at least in Okaloosa County, a parent is fighting the right to be able to volunteer at his child's school due to a felony conviction from almost 20 years ago!
    Do you think it's right that someone who has turned their life around and is simply wanting to do the best for their child is being refused because of his past?

    I know here in the UK we have background checks done by the Disclosure and Barring Service. You need this check if you're working with children or vulnerable adults, however I know that having a criminal record doesn't necessarily mean you wont be able to volunteer at your child's school, it'll be much dependant upon the nature of the crime committed as well as how long ago said crime was. Obviously if your crime was child abuse, then you'll have no hope in being accepted, however if it was something like threatening behaviour 20 years ago, then I'm sure you'll have no problems.

    However that isn't the case for Jason Harwell (Source below) as he's being refused permission to volunteer at his child's school because of that exact reason.

    What are your thoughts on this?
    Should it be a blanket policy, or should the school/state/council handle it case-by-case?
    Source


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    Last edited by Sectional; 09-01-2020 at 10:07 PM.



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  2. #2
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    Default

    This debate is now open!



    I deserve to be alright, I deserve to sleep at night
    I'm my closest friend, I remind myself again
    Better treat him well, cause he's with me till the end


    I'm not senDing sublimInal messagEs to rule breakers

  3. #3
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    It's currently based on the nature of the conviction and that's the way it should stay. I'm sure certain convictions disappear from disclosure requests anyway after a certain amount of time. Your past should not tarnish your future, people can and do change. However, certain convictions must always be a no.

  4. #4
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    It'd depend what crime was committed and the nature of the new job. If his conviction involved children in any way I would say no, he shouldn't be allowed to volunteer in that specific position. Understandably, someone can change and they may regret their decisions from years ago, but there's nothing to say that working/volunteering in that situation could trigger old habits or memories. I don't think this just applies for working with children though; for example if someone was convicted for theft years prior, then would you trust them in a position in say a supermarket or as an accountant?

    There's someone who I know who came into my old place of work, who I know has a criminal record from stealing from the elderly (she worked in care and stole from the people she was meant to be helping). Whenever she comes in the shop, I am wary because I know what she has done and what she is capable of. She would never be allowed to work in care again regardless of how many years pass, but she then wouldn't be trusted in a position that handles money (like above).

    Overall, it all depends on what crime was committed and what it involved. At the same time though, I believe it should be up to the employee or whoever they would be volunteering for. Some people deserve second chances, others overstep the line in whatever crime they broke and therefore do not deserve one [a second chance].

  5. #5
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    Convicted felon is a strange term for a British person to use, you mean Convicted criminal?

    And depends on the crime like the others have said. The old adage though, leopards don't change their spots...

    and yes i've found my second wind

  6. #6
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    As a mother, I say no. I don't want someone who has the nature or capability to commit a crime to be in a position where my child would look up to them, or learn from. 20 years ago or not, if you allow it for one you have to allow for more & that just doesn't sit well with me.

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